Commit 39a583ebd4bc7a8f40fc885c88f486b0a19487ce

Authored by ankraft
1 parent 54f05333

fixed typos

... ... @@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ HGI has discussed with many SDOs to validate these concepts. SDT is designed to
32 32  
33 33 The SDT supports the use of a set of templates for generic devices or appliances (e.g. for a dimmable lamp, a basic washing machine, etc, which would be specific instances of the "Device" object , which form the basis of APIs used by application developers. These templates can also be referenced by manufacturers creating XML documents to describe their specific products. For example, the SDT enables specification of a generic washing machine template, with on/off, set-wash-temperature, pause and a few other commands, which could be referenced by a manufacturer as the schema for a XML description of a basic model washing machine. The SDT allows for vendor-specific additional commands (ModuleClasses) to suit specific product types.
34 34  
35   -The interoperability benefits can potentially partially obtain even without a fully complete interoperability of the SDT. For example, the most common functions can be modeled with SDT, and more particular functions can be modeled with technology-specific, proprietary, or seldom-used aspects.
  35 +The interoperability benefits can potentially partially be obtained even without a fully complete interoperability of the SDT. For example, the most common functions can be modeled with SDT, and more particular functions can be modeled with technology-specific, proprietary, or seldom-used aspects.
36 36  
37 37 Various details about the recommended structure for SDTs are described in the next sections. The key point to keep in mind is that HGI sought a compromise between, at the one extreme, complete flexibility (which could describe any device, of any complexity) and, at the other extreme, a rigid structure which could be 100% validated and lead to validated software APIs.
38 38  
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... ... @@ -29,10 +29,13 @@ The key to the diagram elements of the UML diagrams above and the snippets in th
29 29  
30 30 ![](images/SDT_UML_Key.png)
31 31  
  32 +<a name="Domain"></a>
32 33  
33   -## Components
  34 +The syntax used in the diagram to model an XML Schema Definition (XSD) as an UML diagram follows the following approaches:
  35 +
  36 +- [Design XML schemas using UML](http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/x-umlschem/)
  37 +- [UML For W3C XML Schema Design](http://www.xml.com/pub/a/2002/08/07/wxs_uml.html)
34 38  
35   -<a name="Domain"></a>
36 39 ### Domain
37 40  
38 41 ![](images/Domain.png)
... ... @@ -48,7 +51,7 @@ It can also be used to collect all specified [ModuleClasses](#ModuleClasses)
48 51 #### Elements
49 52 - **[Doc](#Documentation)** : Documentation for the *Domain*. Optional.
50 53 - **Imports** : XML import/include of other XML files. Optional.
51   -- **[Module](#ModuleClass)** : A list of *Module* components that are global to the whole domain. Optional.
  54 +- **[Module](#ModuleClass)** : A list of those *Module* components that are global to the whole domain. Optional.
52 55 - **[Devices](#Device)** : a List of *Devices* components. Optional.
53 56  
54 57 #### Example
... ... @@ -78,7 +81,7 @@ It can also be used to collect all specified [ModuleClasses](#ModuleClasses)
78 81  
79 82 The *Device* was initially thought of as the representation of "the basic things we are trying to model" and can still be considered so. However, after discussion with various SDOs, it was decided to add also "[sub-devices](#SubDevice)". That is, there is one level of hierarchy to allow modeling of e.g. a set of independent energy monitoring plugs in a single addressable power-extension-block. (Other SDOs might consider it more appropriate to use a recursive sub-sub-sub ... device definition). Note that all the different devices which one needs to model within a Domain are composed of one or more [Modules](#ModuleClass).
80 83  
81   -For each physical device on the network at least one *Device* **must** be defined. If the physical device is a simple device, ie. it does not contain embedded devices, e.g. a light switch, it does not include further [SubDevices](#SubDevices). On the other hand, if the physical is a compound device, ie. it does contain embedded devices that can be addressed separately, the *Device* **should** contain [SubDevices](SubDevices) for each of the identifiable embedded devices.
  84 +For each physical device on the network at least one *Device* **must** be defined. If the physical device is a simple device, i.e. it does not contain embedded devices, e.g. a light switch, it does not include further [SubDevices](#SubDevices). On the other hand, if the physical is a compound device, i.e. it does contain embedded devices that can be addressed separately, the *Device* **should** contain [SubDevices](SubDevices) for each of the identifiable embedded devices.
82 85  
83 86 An example for a compound device is a connected power-strip where each of the sockets can be switched on and off individually. The power-strip itself can provide functions such as "all sockets off" and "overall power consumption".
84 87  
... ... @@ -115,7 +118,7 @@ An example for a compound device is a connected power-strip where each of the s
115 118 ### SubDevice
116 119 *SubDevices* are optional components of a [Device](#Device). They represent physical sub-devices and services inside another device (the *Device*).
117 120  
118   -*SubDevices* may define their own [ModuleClasses](#ModuleClass) or extend ModulesClasses of its or another [Domain](#Domain).
  121 +*SubDevices* may define their own [ModuleClasses](#ModuleClass) or extend *ModuleClasses* of it's or another [Domain](#Domain).
119 122  
120 123 ![](images/SubDevice.png)
121 124  
... ... @@ -148,7 +151,7 @@ An example for a compound device is a connected power-strip where each of the s
148 151  
149 152 *Property* elements are used to append to [Devices](#Device) and their [ModuleClass](ModuleClass) elements with arbitrary additional information. For [Devices](#Device) it would be very common for a manufacturer to want to add into the XML file which is describing the device such information as "Manufacturing Site", "Date of Manufacture", "Certification Code", "Energy Label Code", "compatible LAN technology", "URL for the device handbook", "physical limits of operation environments", etc.
150 153  
151   -Some of that information might in some devices be available by reading a specific device [DataPoint](#DataPoint), however even if it cannot be read from the device then at least it can be noted in the device's XML description. Examples for organizations that specifiy these kind of added "Property" information are [eCl@ss](http://www.eclass.eu) and [UNSPSC](http://www.unspsc.org) (United Nations Standard Products and Services Code).
  154 +Some of that information might in some devices be available by reading a specific device [DataPoint](#DataPoint), however even if it cannot be read from the device then at least it can be noted in the device's XML description. Examples for organizations that specify these kind of added "Property" information are [eCl@ss](http://www.eclass.eu) and [UNSPSC](http://www.unspsc.org) (United Nations Standard Products and Services Code).
152 155  
153 156 Since the *Properties* are highly varied, depending on industry segment, no attempt is made in the SDT to constrain the options: however it is highly recommended to provide software-developer-friendly information in the [Doc](#Documentation) field of each Property.
154 157  
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